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News from the Leeward Side…

Posted by Tall Ships America on April 17, 2014

Seasickness. It’s an unspoken word amongst youth and adults hoping to sail as trainees on a tall ship. They might stash some Dramamine® in their duffel bags before they come aboard or show off their scopolamine patches as soon as the docklines are cast off. But, despite their preparation, youth and adult trainees alike are hoping that they will never experience the misery of seasickness.

The professional mariners aboard understand that it’s a component of seafaring. They know that some of these anxious trainees will turn pale as soon as the ship leaves safe harbor, while others will be writing in their journals and begging to go aloft as the seas swell to six feet, or more. But the professional mariners also know that, as the saying goes, ‘If you have never been seasick, you just haven’t met the right conditions yet.’ Eventually, it can strike anyone.

And when those unlucky sailors do fall seasick, they are told to make the best of it, to keep a good attitude as they toil through. For this reason, seasickness is often the subject matter of crass humor and lively seas stories told at the galley table. But Rebecca Kuehn, of STI Youth Australia, has brought a new component to this ‘distasteful’ topic. Her hypothesis: That surviving and/or witnessing seasickness may in fact further the aims of sail training, as it pertains to teamwork, leadership, communication skills, and personal development.

Her article, with its surveys and analysis, was published in Sail Training International‘s April 2014 newsletter .

We hope you enjoy her new take on this age-old issue. And, please – for everyone’s sake, avoid chili in a storm.

Eliza dresses up as a package of saltines while celebrating Halloween on the High Seas in 2009.

Eliza dresses up as a package of saltines while celebrating Halloween on the High Seas.

Eliza reads up on the etymology of seasickness at the Columbia River Maritime Museum.

Eliza reads up on the etymology of seasickness at the Columbia River Maritime Museum.

 

 

 

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