TALL SHIPS CHALLENGE® Series Official Blog

Sea stories, scuttlebutt and fantastic photos covering America\’s official Tall Ships® Races!

  • Follow Us

  • Follow the blog- Click below to have posts delivered to your inbox

  • Search posts by category

  • Archives

  • Advertisements

Archive for the ‘2008’ Category

Sail onboard the USCG Eagle!

Posted by Tall Ships America on December 11, 2018

Calling all Tall Ships America members!
You can help sail EAGLE across the Atlantic Ocean! The ship will depart Baltimore, MD on or about 08 April and arrive Portsmouth, England on or about 27 April. Volunteers have the option to depart in England or sail on and help provide ship tours in Oslo, Norway and Kiel, Germany. If you decide to stay on to help with tours, you will depart EAGLE no later than 11 May from Kiel, Germany. Berthing is free. Volunteers must pay for own transportation to/from ship and meals.

EAGLE seeks able-bodied mariners between 18 – 50 years old who will, when underway, work the rig, stand 8 hours/ day of watch tending sails and/or helm/lookout, and provide 1 day/week of messcook or scullery service. If assisting in port as well, they seek mariners who can help provide up to 10 hrs/day of “tour duty” every 3rd day.

EAGLE is the sail-training vessel for the US Coast Guard Academy. The ship’s displacement is 1800 long tons. She is propelled with 23 sails and a dual turbo motor turbine unit engine capable of 1,200 HP.

eagle

Please submit an application to Erin Short by January 31st according to the criteria and instructions below. You will be notified of your acceptance by February 8th.

Program Details:
1.)You must be at least 18 years old and not more than 50 years old.
2.) You must be fit, willing and able to work aloft. You must pass a medical clearance.
3.) You must be a U.S. Citizen.
4.) You will be full a participant in the operation of the ship: standing watch, helm, lookout, bridge, maintenance, working aloft, galley and all other regular trainee duties.
5.) You are welcome and STRONGLY ENCOURAGED to attend training classes with the USCG crew.
6.) The ideal candidate is an experienced, rising sail training practitioner. This program is not for “Old Salts”, and it is not for first-timers.
7.) Upon successful completion of the program, EAGLE will issue to you (if you request it) a letter of Sea Service or other formal documentation of your sea service in EAGLE.
8.) Participants must pay $12/day for food and expenses, etc. Total cost of food for 21 days will be approximately $250.

9.) Participants will write a post voyage blog post and share pictures with Tall Ships America to share with their members.

Application Details:
1.) All applications must be submitted electronically to Tall Ships America at erin@tallshipsamerica.org no later than 5:00pm EST on January 31st
2.) You must be a Tall Ships America member in good standing to apply. Not a member? Become one now!
3.) Applications must include the following:
a.) Resume of your traditional ship experience, as crew or as trainee
b.) Letter of recommendation from your current (or most recent) Captain or First Mate
c.) Welcome packet with Waiver of Liability and Indemnity Agreement and Guest Medical Forms will be provided to accepted applicants by mid-February.

This opportunity is available to you based on the mutual regard and respect that is shared between the EAGLE leadership and Tall Ships America, and in support of our shared mission in promoting leadership training under sail.

This is truly a rare and special opportunity, and we are very happy to be able make it available to you, the up-and-coming next generation of sail training officers and crew.

Advertisements

Posted in 2019, EAGLE Seamanship Program, USCG | Leave a Comment »

Professional Development Cruise Aboard USCG Barque EAGLE

Posted by Tall Ships America on July 13, 2015

CAPTAIN MEILSTRUP IS OFFERING AN OPPORTUNITY TO
EXPERIENCED TALL SHIP SAILORS FROM THE TALL SHIPS AMERICA FLEET
TO SAIL ON THE USCG BARQUE EAGLE
ON A VOYAGE FROM NEW LONDON, CT TO BALTIMORE, MD
FROM AUGUST 16 TO AUGUST 29 2015

APPLY TO: ERIN SHORT AT TALL SHIPS AMERICA
APPLICATION DEADLINE: THURSDAY, JULY 30
MORE DETAILS: CLICK HERE

USCGC Eagle. Photo Credit: Thad Koza

USCGC Eagle. Photo Credit: Thad Koza

Enjoy a unique opportunity for Tall Ships America Members to advance their professional training, qualifications, skills, and credentials in a sail training program aboard America’s Tall Ship.

Experienced tall ships sailors are invited to join Captain Meilstrup and Coast Guard Officer Candidates on a voyage from New London, CT to Baltimore, MD between August 16th and August 29th, 2015. Restrictions apply.

For more details, read Barque EAGLE invites Tall Ships America Members to sail aboard.

Posted in 2015, EAGLE Seamanship Program | Leave a Comment »

Hold Fast (It Would Be Silly To Let Go)

Posted by Tall Ships America on September 7, 2014

I was a rigrat until the day I got an office job. But I continued to clamber up every ship’s rig that I could, which is how I ended up aloft on the Star of India last week. It was a sunny day without much breeze, and the San Diego sky was almost as blue as the water. The Maritime Museum of San Diego had generously offered to take a knot of sailors aloft during the Festival of Sail.

First came the physical test, to demonstrate that we had the strength and ability to hold fast in the rigging. Next, we tugged on harnesses and listened to a safety briefing. Then, one by one, we pulled ourselves up onto a rail as high off the deck as I am tall, swung out over the water to grasp the lower shrouds, and began to climb.

IMG_1401 IMG_1393

At 278’ sparred length, the Star of India is the largest tall ship I’ve been on, and the components of her rig are as large as any I’ve seen. Traditionally rigged and iron-hulled, she is reminiscent of an era in which iron was becoming more prevalent in shipbuilding, and her rig reflects this juxtaposition of “old” and “new” materials. With a tight grip and sure footing, I scampered up the served and tarred starboard shrouds after a Star of India volunteer and a recently-acquainted friend from Pilgrim. Just below the futtocks, I paused, and stretched one leg outwards until my toes were resting on the parrel, an iron collar that attaches the mast to the yard. With a thrust of momentum, I drew my body across a gap between the shrouds and the main yard, forty feet above the wooden deck, and balanced myself against the cold metal of the course. With a call of “Laying on Starboard!”, I slid off the parrel and planted the arches of my Converse on the footropes. I was still free-climbing, clasping the solid jackstay as I inched my way sideways along the seventy-two foot long yard. But moments later, as our little group reached the end of the yard, I had a chance to clip in with my harness and pause to survey the view.

Looking down from Star of India

Photo Credit: Taylor McClanahan

 The water was below me, perhaps sixty feet beneath my feet. Within the bay, the water was calm, and the only waves that rocked our ship came from the wakes of passing vessels. On the deck, curious visitors the size of my thumb gazed skyward at us in the rigging. A crew member had gathered several children and adults and was assisting them in hauling lines to set sails. Towards shore, the festival grounds were packed. A line of visitors waited in line to get their souvenir passports stamped with images of the vessels they’d seen. Another crowd of festival-goers had converged on the vendor tents, eager for food and drink in the hot sun. Up on the windward yard, I could no longer smell the kettle corn that had been so enticing at ground level. But it was pleasant to simply be aloft again, for the first time in nearly a year, to swing my feet on the footropes and feel the wind in my hair.

Crew from Irving on Star of India

Photo Credit: Taylor McClanahan

Posted in 2014, Festival of Sail San Diego | 2 Comments »

Northbound

Posted by Tall Ships America on September 2, 2014

A view from the water

The waterfront here in San Diego is quiet. Too quiet. After four days of cannon fire reverberating throughout the downtown, crowds of people, and live music, it is disconcerting to hear the everyday sounds of San Diego on a typical weekday morning. Everything is back to normal. Luckily, Eliza, Halcyon and I have one more event in Dana Point next weekend. One more event to spend time with the tall ships and the new friends we have made out here on the West Coast. It’s hard to believe we are even at this point. Yesterday, we said goodbye to Halcyon as she sailed away on Irving Johnson, all smiles (Stay tuned for another blog post about her adventures on board). Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in 2014, Festival of Sail San Diego, Internship Program, Tall Ship Events | 1 Comment »

My Tole Mour Experience

Posted by Tall Ships America on August 30, 2014

My Tole Mour Experience

It was about 0800 when Erin and Eliza dropped me off at Tole Mour’s dock. It seemed like they were my parents, all happy and excited to see their young daughter go off on a new adventure. After they left, the crew on Tole Mour showed all the trainees which bunk section we would be staying in. I was staying in the section called Santa Rosa, with two other girls. We were able to pick our own bunks, so I choose the forward most bunk with a porthole view, which later became a problem on my part (seasickness).

CAM01862

About 0930, all hands were called forward for a muster. Captain Snark and Holly gave the welcome speech, talked about the boat, and gave information about the race. They showed us the course and explained the rules of the race. At that point I was very excited because I’ve never been part of the TALL SHIPS CHALLENGE® Race Series. After a clear understanding that we were going to win, they wanted us all to introduce ourselves, so we had to answer 3 questions. What is your name? Where are you from? And what’s your favorite animated Disney movie? With that, I learnt that most of the crew was from the mid-west and there were a lot of animated Disney movies I haven’t seen. By the way, I’m from New York and my favorite animated Disney movie is “The Tigger Movie.” After a round of funny but interesting introductions, we were given our sea watches. I was placed in watch one, with 4 crew members and 5 trainees. The first thing we did was reintroduce ourselves to each other, then did a tour of the boat. While we were touring the boat, the crew members spoke to us about drills and muster stations; within the next 10 minutes, we heard an alarm and the crew shouting “abandon ship drill, abandon ship drill.” Everyone gathered to their muster stations and donned life jackets. After the drill, we all mustered forward again to get divided into two activity stations: line handling and marlinspike & seamanship. My first activity was line handling; they showed us how to make a line off to a pin, take a line off the pin safely and how to coil. Also they taught us the terms they use when handling lines, like ”made ready” which means have a top and bottom turn on the pin and “super ready” which means to only have a bottom turn on the pin.

The race stared at 1400. We crossed the starting line about a minute after the race started with Irving Johnson next to us and Exy Johnson and Bill of Rights behind us. It was a wonderful sight, seeing the cliffs of San Pedro behind us as we sailed towards San Clemente Island and San Diego. We had great wind conditions the whole trip. While we were sailing past Catalina Island, we spotted two whales in the distance. It was an amazing sight, especially for me because I never see any sea mammals in New York Harbor.

My watch that night was from 0000 to 0400; that was my first time sailing through the night. And it was just horrible – from the moment I got on deck, I felt sea sick. A crew member gave me some ginger ale, crackers, and some tips on how to stop feeling sick, but none of that prevented me from throwing up at least 5 times in a red bucket that was labelled “you will feel better :)” but, on the plus side, while I was coming up for air, I noticed about 1000 starts in the sky, and no other boats around us.

CAM01893

We had breakfast at 0700 and I felt much better. Shortly after breakfast, the captain announced that we had crossed the finish line and all the other boats were about 3 hours behind us. So, of course, everyone on board was thrilled on our possible win of the race. We turned on our engines, struck all sails, and began motoring towards La Jolla for some more activities. At 1030, we anchored off of La Jolla to do some snorkeling and some shanty singing. I chose to go snorkeling, so I got fitted for a wet suit, mask, boots, and fins. After a half hour of me struggling to put everything on, I entered the water, feet first to start an underwater adventure. The water was surprisingly warm and clear, so that didn’t stop us from seeing 10 leopard sharks, 2 horn sharks and a lot of sea grass. We got back on the boat in time for dinner, which I can say was amazing, then continued with some lovely shanty singing led by the crew and trainees.

My last moments on Tole Mour were the best. While heading back to the dock, a pod of dolphins followed us for about 2 hours, having fun with their babies, jumping in and out of the water and crossing under our bow. It was an amazing sight that I only got on video and soon hope to share with a lot more people.

I loved the people I sailed with on Tole Mour and looking forward to more adventures on the sail up to Dana Point.

CAM01867

 

Posted in 2014, Festival of Sail San Diego, Internship Program, Los Angeles, CA, Races, Tall Ship Events | Leave a Comment »

Staying classy in San Diego

Posted by Tall Ships America on August 29, 2014

At the start_Irving Johnson_Tole Mour_Exy Johnson

At the start_Irving Johnson_Tole Mour_Exy Johnson

After a busy week and a great race start in San Pedro, the Tall Ships America Race Team rolled in to San Diego on Tuesday ready for the Festival of Sail. While Halcyon sailed down the coast on Tole Mour (recap coming soon), Eliza and I scouted the site, did some laundry and enjoyed the wonderful waterfront that San Diego Maritime Museum presides over. San Diego Harbor is always full of sailboats and, as two shorebound sailors, Eliza and I can’t help but want to be out on the water enjoying the steady breeze. But the TALL SHIPS CHALLENGE(r) requires our attention so we are content with just looking on enviously. San Diego Maritime Museum always puts on a wonderful event and, as the ships arrived at the dock yesterday after the Parade of Sail, the crew was happy to be here. Last night was the crew party on the Berkeley and our Executive Director, Bert Rogers, was on hand to present the awards for the race from San Pedro to San Diego, by way of San Clemente Island. From what I have heard, it was a spectacular run down to San Diego, complete with whale sightings, strong winds, shooting stars and, my personal favorite, dolphins playing in phosphorescence.

Race Results

We had four participants for the race – Tole Mour, Bill of Rights, Irving Johnson and Exy Johnson. The winners of the race are as follows:

Third Place – Exy Johnson
Second Place – Irving Johnson
First Place – Tole Mour

Thank you to all the participants and congratulations to Tole Mour! A huge thank you to LA Yacht Club in San Pedro for their time and help in pulling off a great race start.

For more photos, visit our Flickr page and for more updates follow us on Twitter @tallshipsfleet

Posted in 2014, Festival of Sail San Diego, Races, Tall Ship Events | Leave a Comment »

Welcome to La-la-land

Posted by Tall Ships America on August 23, 2014

Irving Johnson, Exy Johnson, and Amazing Grace during the Parade of Sail into San Pedro. Photo: Port of LA

Irving Johnson, Exy Johnson, and Amazing Grace during the Parade of Sail into San Pedro. Photo: Port of LA

There is something about a fresh cinnamon roll that makes you realize your day is going to be just fine. This morning, during our early rounds of the Tall Ships(R) Festival LA, I timed it perfectly and was well rewarded for my efforts. The site was quiet, far different from all the crowds and preparation of the days before. However, it was the calm before the storm. Today, Saturday, the festival grounds are rocking and rolling – dozens of food trucks line the dock, cranking out everything from Mexi-Greek fusion to “lobstah” rolls, each with their own music and vibe. The four stages are constantly swarming with people listening to traditional Hawaiian music, classic rock and even The King- Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in 2014, Internship Program, Los Angeles, CA, Races, Tall Ship Events | Leave a Comment »

What’s Better Than A Bald EAGLE?

Posted by Tall Ships America on July 17, 2014

No, not him…

KINDA BALD EAGLES. KINDA BALD EAGLES WITH HAIR.

Credit: iD Gum / iSpot.tv

 

The BARQUE EAGLE!

EAGLE - Parade of Sail in Halifax 2012

EAGLE – Parade of Sail in Halifax 2012

 

REMINDER NOTICE TO EXPERIENCED MARITIME CREW

DEADLINE TO SUBMIT APPLICATIONS: JULY 25, 2014

Enjoy a unique opportunity for Tall Ships America Members to advance their professional training, qualifications, skills, and credentials in a sail training program aboard America’s Tall Ship.

Experienced tall ships sailors are invited to join Captain Pulver and Coast Guard and NOAA Officer Trainees on a voyage from Gloucester, MA to Baltimore, MD between August 30th and September 11th, 2014. Restrictions apply.

For details, read Sail Training and Professional Development aboard USCG Barque EAGLE

Posted in 2014, EAGLE Seamanship Program | Leave a Comment »

#966 Singing to pass the time

Posted by Tall Ships America on November 3, 2011

 

This past weekend, I was in Los Angeles to help out a friend with a scare-you-senseless haunted house.  There were about 90 people (over half of whom were tall ship sailors) on site as part of the tech crew, construction crew and scarers in the house itself. Everyone met up at a parking garage to take a shuttle over to the site in the afternoon. There was a bit of a snafu with the shuttle and we ended up waiting about an hour on Level 2 of the garage, anxious and excited. Instead of grumbling, someone had the foresight to bring a guitar and everyone burst into sea shanties.

Much, much later that night, after the party had ended in the wee hours of the morning and all the paying guests were stumbling and shuffling their way out the gates, we were sitting around serenading them as they waited on line. We must have looked like we were having fun because people kept leaving the line to crash our party. Sorry, folks, sailors and crew only.  It was a great way to end the night and reminded me of the fact that, whether with a piece of  twine practising  knots or just singing a favorite shanty, on a boat or on land, tall ship sailors are so good at keeping themselves entertained and that makes them awesome.

Below is an example of a shanty from our annual conference in Cleveland a few years back – Read the original post here – Hank goes into a bit of detail about the history of the song and then the singing starts at about 1:15

 

Have an idea or a story you want to share? Email it to me at erin@tallshipsamerica.org and I’ll add it to the blog with props to you.

Major credit to 1000 Awesome Things for the inspiration

Posted in 2011, Awesome Things, Los Angeles, CA | 1 Comment »

#967 Bosun’s Whistle

Posted by Tall Ships America on October 18, 2011

Back in 2008, I was at the TALL SHIPS CHALLENGE® event in San Diego and we had the opportunity to host the Colombian naval tall ship, GLORIA. As the ship was arriving, Colombian’s thronged the dock, waving the country’s flag and singing along to the 11 verses of the national anthem. All the while, the crew was standing on the yardarms and the shipboard cannons were blasting. It is still one of the most impressive arrivals I’ve seen. Our information booth and education center was set up along the dock next to the ship so we got to observe shipboard life up close.

An interesting aspect was, for the first time, I heard a bosun’s whistle being used for all commands, not just for the pipe aboard or general call. No words were exchanged as the crew went about their duties according to what was piped. Because of it’s loud pitch, the whistle can be heard over the sounds of the ocean, bad weather, crew activity, etc. In subsequent years, I have seen this on other naval ships, but that year was the first time and it was fascinating to see that tradition (one that goes back to the 13th century) still at work in our modern fleet. That is what makes tall ships so intriguing, this blend of the traditional and the contemporary. Learning how to appreciate how far we have come, and yet embracing these time honored practices and taking pride in our history is awesome.

Have an idea or a story you want to share? Email it to me at erin@tallshipsamerica.org and I’ll add it to the blog with props to you.

Major credit to 1000 Awesome Things for the inspiration

Posted in 2011, Awesome Things, Festival of Sail San Diego | 1 Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: